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Table 1 LEAP for life training program lesson topics, learning objectives, activities and duration

From: Study protocol: translating and implementing psychosocial interventions in aged home care the lifestyle engagement activity program (LEAP) for life

Training lesson topic Learning objectives Training activities Time (hours)
Case Manager
Introduction to LEAP and goal setting with clients • To understand why the LEAP for Life program is important 1. Introduction of facilitator/s and ground rules 3
  • To learn SMART social and recreational goal setting skills 2. Icebreaker –where key life moments are shared to emphasise the importance of socialisation and recreation  
  • To learn how to select and modify goals for community aged care clients in relation to their cognitive and functional ability 3. LEAP for Life within a community aged care context: a) Maslow’s hierarchy of needs b) the importance of LEAP b) how to implement LEAP in community aged care  
  • To learn how to incorporate social and leisure goals into current care plans with community aged care clients 4. Workshop as a group a) setting a SMART goal, and b) setting SMART goal sub-steps  
  • To explore ways of and barriers to, implementing the skills and strategies learnt in training, into their usual practice 5. Role play in pairs setting SMART goals with clients  
   6. Brainstorm as a group how to maximise implementation and sustainability of LEAP within own organisation  
   7. Self-reflection activity on what each person will put into practice from the session  
Care worker  
Introduction to LEAP, communication skills, engaging clients and reminiscence • To understand the importance of engaging and supporting clients through socialisation and recreation 1. Introduction of facilitator/s and ground rules 3
  • To understand the purpose of the LEAP for life program, and program structure 2. “Whoosh” ball game icebreaker: a physical group activity to get the group engaged, comfortable and having fun  
  • To understand that goal setting with clients will occur, and how they may contribute to achieving goals 3. Brainstorm as a group the care workers role and what care workers like/dislike about their job  
  • To understand how to involve and engage clients more during usual care 4. Overview of LEAP for Life: a) the program logic model b) an understanding that goal setting with clients will occur  
  • To improve listening skills using body language and questioning 5. Brainstorm as a group the benefits of keeping active  
  • To understand the principles of reminiscence 6. Brainstorm as group how to involve clients more during usual care activities  
   7. Communication skills pair work exercises: a) the importance of good body language b) active listening – paraphrasing, reflecting, mirroring, paying compliments  
   8. Brainstorm as a group how to get people talking and play “six degrees of separation” game in pairs.  
   9. Brainstorm as a group how to encourage clients to reminisce  
   10. Group discussion about what to do when the conversation goes wrong  
   11. Self-reflection activity on what each person will put into practice from the session  
Engaging clients with dementia • To revise previous session behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementiaTo understand the 1. Introduction of facilitator/s and ground rules 2
  • To develop skills on communicating with people with dementia 2. Group discussion about strategies learnt or practiced last session  
  • To develop skills on task analysis 3. “Whoosh” ball game icebreaker: a physical group activity to get the group engaged, comfortable and having fun  
  • To develop skills in using Montessori principles to present and tailor activities for people with dementia 4. Dementia: a) an understanding that people with dementia may express challenging behaviour because of an unmet need or changes in the brain b) an understanding that LEAP for Life may help to address unmet needs  
   5. Brainstorm as a group good practices when communicating with people with dementia  
   6. Broken Telephone activity to demonstrate the importance of clear and slow speech and “looking” for feedback  
   7. Balloon modelling mirroring activity to demonstrate the value of modelling rather than describing a task  
   8. Brainstorm as a group task analysis and modification of making a cup of instant coffee  
   9. Montessori Principles: a) introduction, b) sorting activity demonstration with cutlery c) group brainstorm as to other activities one might be able to do around the house with a client with dementia d) role play in pairs turning a household object into an activity with a person with dementia  
   10. Self-reflection activity on what each person will put into practice from the session  
Incorporating music and physical activity into daily care • To revise previous session 1. Introduction of facilitator/s and ground rules 2
  • To understand and experience the benefits of music 2. Group discussion about strategies learnt or practiced last session.  
  • To learn how to select and incorporate into daily care individualised music for clients 3. “Name that song” group activity to experience the enjoyment and reminiscence effects of music  
  • To learn how to encourage a person with dementia to actively engage with music 4. Brainstorm as a group how to select music with and for clients and for different moods  
  • To understand the benefits of physical activity 5. Brainstorm as a group how to incorporate music into daily care with clients  
  • To learn how to incorporate physical activity into daily care 6. Group singing activity to give care workers confidence in singing and to experience the benefits of engaging in music with others  
  • To learn about activities and approaches that might be most suited to engaging male clients 7. “Follow my leader” paired activity to practice encouraging people with dementia to move along to music  
   8. Brainstorm as a group activities and approaches most suited to engaging male clients  
   9. Facts about exercise trivia quiz to emphasise benefits of physical activity  
   10. Brainstorm as a group how to encourage clients to be physically active  
   11. Self-reflection activity on what each person will put into practice from the session  
Humour and play and status and reciprocity • To revise previous session 1. Introduction of facilitator/s and ground rules 2
  • To understand what play and humour are and their benefits 2. Group discussion about strategies learnt or practiced last session  
  • To understand appropriate and inappropriate play and humour 3. Chair swap circle game: a physical group activity icebreaker to get the group engaged, comfortable and having fun; and to experience the playful approach important in initiating a playful encounter  
  • To develop skills to be more playful with clients 4. Group discussion about what play is, and the difference between a playful activity and a playful state  
  • To develop problem-solving skills and creativity 5. Brainstorm as a group the social, emotional and physical benefits of play  
  • To explore barriers to play and humour with clients 6. Group discussion about using play at work focused on promoting the understanding that being playful at work will increase creativity, and in turn improve problem-solving ability  
  • To understand and develop strategies for increasing the status of clients 7. Circle drawing activity to practice thinking creatively  
  • To identify practices to maximise sustainability of LEAP within organisation 8. Group problem-solving exercise about a hypothetical challenging client to practice applying creative thinking to work problems  
   9. Group discussion about Marin’s four distinct styles of humour, and self-reflection on own humour style  
   10. Brainstorm as a group ways to be more playful and humorous with clients  
   11. Brainstorm as a group risks and barriers of being playful with clients  
   12. Group discussion about the concept of status and the loss of status in older people  
   13. Brainstorm as a group ways to increase the perceived status of clients  
   14. Group reflection about the skills care workers have learnt over the course of the LEAP training program  
   15. Brainstorm as a group ways in which the care organisation can maximise the sustainability of LEAP  
LEAP Champion  
The LEAP Champion role, organizational change and interpersonal skill sin person persuasion • To get to know other LEAP champions and form a collaborative network; 1. Introduction of facilitator/s and ground rules 5
  • To be clear about LEAP champion role within own organisation; 2. Icebreaker – getting to know the other LEAP Champions and finding out three things each has in common  
  • To anticipate difficulties in promoting change within organisation and brainstorm solutions; 3. Brainstorm as a group the LEAP Champion role  
  • To improve interpersonal skills in person persuasion – active listening, constructive feedback, negotiation, assertiveness, and persuasion; 4. The change process: a) Roger’s diffusion of innovations process, b) Roger’s adopter categories  
  • To define how LEAP will work in each individual’s own schedule and organisation. 5. Brainstorm as a group what characteristics and skills the LEAP Champion will ideally have  
   6. Self-reflection exercise on each individual’s strengths and challenges in regards to the LEAP Champion role  
   7. Communication and Influencing Skills: a) good listening pair work exercise b) giving feedback – pair work exercise using the sandwich technique c) assertiveness skills group role-play d) negotiation tactics and persuasion tips e) persuasion skills pair work exercise  
   8. Groups discussion about the buddy shift  
   9. Individual exercise planning how each LEAP champion will manage their one work day of LEAP  
   10. Brainstorm as a group how UNSW will support the LEAP champions in their role  
   11. Self-reflection activity on what each person will put into practice from the session