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Table 4 Example of a 12-week structured RET-based exercise programa

From: Singapore multidisciplinary consensus recommendations on muscle health in older adults: assessment and multimodal targeted intervention across the continuum of care

Week 1–2 3–4 5–6 7–8 9–10 11–12
Aim Attain Adaptability Develop Muscle Bulk Build Strength
Type [101] Postural stabilization, Body weight Closed chain exercises Free weights, open chain exercises
Frequency (alternate days per week) 1–2 1–2 2 2 2–3 2–3
bIntensity (number of repetitions to fatigue) [101, 102] 20
low
15
low
12
moderate
10
moderate
8–10
moderate-high
6–8
high
Volume (number of sets) 1 1–2 2 2–3 2–3 3
Specific muscle groups Core:
Abdominals
Back
Chest
Proximal Stabilisers:
Shoulders
Hips
• Wall push ups
• Bench presses
• Crunches
• Lunges
• Mini Squats
• Bridging
Distal Peripherals:
Arms
Legs
Proximal Stabilisers:
Shoulders
Hips
Core:
Abdominals
Back
Chest
• Resistance Bands
• Weight Machine Stations
• Arm Ergometry
• Leg Pedal
Distal Peripheral:
Arms
Legs
Proximal Stabilisers:
Shoulders
Hips
Core:
Abdominals
Back
Chest
• Dumbbells
• Weight Machine Stations
  1. aAdapted and modified from Peterson MD, Gordon PM. Resistance exercise for the aging adult: clinical implications and prescription guidelines. Am J Med 2011;124(3):194–8
  2. bProgression of intensity – initially, the intensity of the exercise (weight or resistance loading) may be increased when the subject can achieve ≥20 repetitions in good form – indicative that current resistance is below the 60% 1RM threshold required for muscle strengthening [102, 103]. Progressively, the load can be adjusted higher to reflect higher intensity through the number of repetitions to fatigue or reduced ability to retain good form. Higher intensity RET can attain fatigue and should be stopped before strain of the training muscle