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Table 2 Frequency of family caregivers’ care needs in four stages of study in different dimensions

From: Investigating the needs of family caregivers of older stroke patients: a longitudinal study in Iran

Needs Stage of study
Admission time Pre-discharge 2 weeks after discharge 12 weeks after discharge
% % % %
Health information
 Respect the patient when performing education, treatment or rehabilitation 100 100 100 100
 Providing information on disease progress 98 98 98 88
 To have my question answered honestly 100 100 100 99
 To have information on medication and treatment 99 99 99 99
 To have information on the patient’s physical problems 98 98 98 98
 To have information on the patient’s rehabilitation progress 96 97 93 70
 To be assured that the best possible medical care is being given to the patient 99 98 82 55
 To be informed about all changes in the patient’s medical status, such as blood 100 100 88 62
 To be informed about the exams and laboratory results daily 99 99 7 4
 To have explanations from professionals given in terms I can understand 97 98 88 64
 To have information on the patient’s thought problems 93 92 29 14
 To know how to communicate with patients 97 97 83 61
 To have information about dying and hospice care when the patient disease reaches the end 87 87 32 25
Community support network
 Conveying advice with the help of professionals 92 92 68 41
 To have other family members understand the patient’s problems 98 98 95 86
 To have support from family and friends 96 96 94 87
 To discuss my feelings about caring for the patient with other friends or family 92 92 85 75
Professional support
 Being informed of how to handle the medical emergencies of the patient 99 99 100 99
 To have comprehensive information for the patient eg, rehabilitation programmes, physical therapy 94 94 88 70
 Being informed on what to do when the patient became upset or acted strange 100 99 84 65
 To discuss with heath care workers on how much the patient can do independently 99 99 81 58
Instrumental support
 To have help from other members of the family in taking care of the patient 99 99 95 87
 To get enough rest or sleep 99 100 99 93
 To have information about financial assistance, eg, physical and mental disability benefits, medical expenses, catastrophic illness benefits, hospital care in seriously ill low-income subsidy 98 98 83 48
 To get a break from my problems and responsibilities 95 95 92 87
 To have time to spend with friends 52 46 17 11
 To have information about homecare (eg, home rehabilitation, day care, respite care) 98 99 97 77
 To have information about assistive devices (eg, beds, wheelchairs, oxygen, suction machine, ventilator) 94 93 42 24
 To have information on patients’ long-term care (eg, nursing home, respiratory care center) 81 81 39 29
 To have help keeping the house (eg, shopping, cleaning, cooking, etc.) 92 92 91 89
Emotional support
 Help remaining hopeful about the future 100 100 92 76
 To be encouraged to ask others to help out 96 96 93 88
 To express my feelings about the patient with someone who has gone through the same experience 96 96 69 50
 To have my partner or friends understand how difficult it is for me 96 96 91 74
 Help in getting over my doubts and fears about the future 97 96 75 65
 To have time to go to temple or church 88 89 88 77
 To be reassured it is usual to have strong negative feelings about the patient 96 95 68 57
 To discuss my feelings about the patient with a professional, eg, anxious, worry, sad, feeling guilty, ange 95 95 83 61
Involvement with patient care
 To learn how to help patients stand up, shift and rehabilitation techniques 98 98 92 76
 To help patients deal with physical care to make patients more comfortable, eg, grooming, bathing and massage 100 100 91 63
 To learn how to prepare meals for patients 98 98 73 29
 To learn nasogastric tube and urinary catheter care 86 83 20 12
 To learn patients’ wound care 91 90 35 22
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