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Table 1 Logic model of the TACIT Tai Chi intervention

From: A randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of tai chi alongside usual care with usual care alone on the postural balance of community-dwelling people with dementia: protocol for the TACIT trial (TAi ChI for people with demenTia)

Inputs Activities Outputs Impacts Outcomes
Human resources:
• Tai Chi instructors to deliver the intervention
• Research team to make telephone calls to remind dyads to attend classes
Products:
• Booklet to support practice of home-based Tai Chi
• Homework sheets to support practice of home-based Tai Chi
• Alarm clocks to help remind dyads to practise Tai Chi at home
Estates:
• Venues in the NHS / community accessible by public transport and that have free car parking for hire of the Tai Chi classes
Intervention contact:
• Weekly 90 min Tai Chi class for 20 weeks (45mins Tai Chi, 45mins socialising/Q&A with instructor)
• A home visit by Tai Chi instructor in weeks 3–4 to support Tai Chi practice at home through behaviour change techniques (joint action & coping planning with carer)
• Telephone contact by research team in weeks 2–18 to remind to attend classes if consecutively fail to attend 2 classes for unknown reason
Intervention led by carer:
• PWD to practise Tai Chi 20 mins per day
• Daily self-monitoring & weekly instructor feedback: PWD to complete a daily diary of Tai Chi practised at home and hand to instructor at Tai Chi class weekly
• Joint action plan for practising Tai Chi at home
• Joint coping plan for practising Tai Chi at home
• Diaries of Tai Chi practised at home
• Increased participation in Tai Chi; physical activity designed to improve balance and prevent falls
• Increased support to do Tai Chi via weekly instructor-led classes
• Increased social support to practise Tai Chi through weekly contact with instructor and peers at the classes, and telephone reminders
• Increased support to do Tai Chi at home via home booklet, homework sheets, action and coping planning, self-monitoring, instructor feedback, and alarm clock reminder
Direct:
• Reduction in risk of falls via increased dynamic balance (postural stability)
• Further reduction in risk of falls via:
(a) increased functional balance (postural stability)
(b) increased static balance (postural stability)
(c) reduced fear of falls
(d) delayed deterioration in global cognitive functioning
(e) delayed deterioration in visual-spatial cognitive functioning
• Reduction in risk of falls in the carer via:
(a) increased dynamic balance (postural stability)
(b) increased static balance (postural stability)
Indirect (via the above):
• Reduction in rate of falls
• Increased quality of life
• Increased quality of life in the carer
• Reduced carer burden