Skip to main content

Table 1 Respondents’ background characteristics (informal caregivers)

From: Does the organisational model of dementia case management make a difference in satisfaction with case management and caregiver burden? An evaluation study

Measurement % (n) Model 1 Model 2 Model 3 Model 4
Gender At start of case management (T1) At start of case management (T1) At start of case management (T1) At start of case management (T1)
  % (n = 140) % (n = 140) % (n = 138) % (n = 126)
 Men 23 % 24 % 25 % 30 %
 Women 77 % 76 % 75 % 70 %
Age     
 Younger than 55 38 % 34 % 32 % 30 %
 55–75 38 % 38 % 37 % 39 %
 75 or older 24 % 28 % 31 % 31 %
 Average age (range) 61.1 (35–88 years) 63.0 (30–88 years) 64.3 (33–87 years) 64.6 (27–92 years)
Relationship to person with dementia     
 Partner 40 % 48 % 43 % 51 %
 Daughter(−in-law)/Son(−in-law) 54 % 46 % 47 % 42 %
 Brother/sister/other relative 3 % 3 % 6 % 4 %
 Friend, acquaintance, neighbour 3 % 3 % 4 % 3 %
Perceived health     
 Excellent/very good/good 65 % 66 % 67 % 62 %
 Moderate 34 % 31 % 30 % 35 %
 Poor 1 % 3 % 3 % 3 %
Duration of informal care     
 Less than 1 year 23 % 24 % 38 % 37 %
 1 to 3 years 40 % 47 % 41 % 37 %
 3 to 5 years 23 % 15 % 13 % 13 %
 5 years or longer 14 % 14 % 8 % 13 %
  1. The number of personal face-to-face contacts with the case manager of the total group varied: in this study, 39 % of the informal carers had contact with the case manager three times or less in the first year after the start of case management (not in table). Nearly half of the informal carers (48 %) had had four to ten face-to-face contacts with the case manager, and 13 % of the informal carers had had more face-to-face contacts with the case manager during the first year of case management (not in table). Face-to-face contacts with the case manager (mainly at the home of the person with dementia) were often combined with e-mail or telephone contacts ‘as needed’